How to upgrade on Virgin Atlantic

by Alex on May 14, 2014

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After my last post (“How I booked a £3000+ flight for £1427“) I got a lot of people asking me about upgrades and miles on Virgin Atlantic so I thought I’d post a little How To on using miles for upgrades on Virgin Atlantic.

The first thing to know is that only certain types of tickets can be upgraded. It’s not as simple as Economy, Premium Economy and Upper. Each cabin has multiple fares and each of those fares have their own uses and restrictions. Currently on Virgin Atlantic there are 13 economy class fares. Yes, 13.

If you’ve already booked your flight….

If you’ve booked your flight already, we need to see if the ticket you have is upgradeable with miles. (If you haven’t booked yet, skip to this part.) The general rule is if you got a super cheap fare, it ain’t gonna be upgradeable.  But the first step is figuring out what fare class you’re booked in. The easiest way is to look at the e-ticket that Virgin Atlantic emails you right after you book. In that email, you can find your fare class:

Virgin Atlantic Fare Class

Ok so how can you tell if your fare is upgradeable? The folks over at V-Flyer have a really handy page that details all the Virgin Atlantic fare codes but for the sake of ease, the following fare codes are upgradeable with miles: Y, B, R, L, & M. So that means the following fare codes are NOT upgradeable with miles: U, E, Q, V, X, N, O, & T.

So you’ve found your booking class and it’s upgradeable. Sweet! Now what? Well now we have to check if there are mileage seats available for you to upgrade into. In other words, are there seats in Premium Economy or Upper Class that have been released or allocated for upgrades. Fortunately, you can check this pretty easily on Virgin Atlantic’s website. Just search for a flight as you normally would BUT specify the class you want to upgrade TO, and make sure you select “Spend your miles” in the final section:

Check Virgin Upgrade Availability

When you click “find my flight” you’ll be prompted to login to your Flying Club account so make sure you do that. On the next page one of three things will happen:

- you’ll get a message saying there is no availability anywhere near your requested date. If you get this message, don’t despair. Keep checking back right up until the day before you’re due to leave as they often release seats closer to departure.
- you’ll get a calendar of alternative dates because the specific date you requested is not available for upgrades. Poke around and see what you can find.
- you’ll get all the info you need to book a flight with miles, which means there is availability to upgrade. Score! N.B. Don’t continue the process from here! We’re not booking a flight, just checking the availability.

So if you land on the magical third option you need to act fast. Call Virgin Atlantic’s reservation number (UK 0844 209 7777  / US +1 800 862 8621) armed with your confirmation code. Tell the friendly reservation agent that you want to upgrade and that you’ve already checked for availability. They’ll be able to take you through the process of upgrading. N.B. You will need to pay the difference in taxes between your original fare and your new plush and fancy fare. But don’t worry, it’s never a huge amount and absolutely worth it.

If you haven’t booked your flight yet…

If you haven’t yet booked your flight you’re in a good position because you can search for upgradeable fares before you book. Virgin Atlantic quietly rolled out a feature on their site that allows you to search by specific fare bucket which is EXTREMELY useful. If you go to the Companion Flight page you’ll see a booking widget towards the end of the page:

Virgin Atlantic Companion FlightsUsing this widget, you can search for specific fare classes and they’ve already done the heavy lifting by only including fares that are eligible for upgrade. So go ahead and search for the flights you want, starting with M class and working your way up until you find a seat. Remember, as you go up from M all the way to Y, it will get more and more expensive.

Once you find a flight you’re happy with in fare class that’s upgradeable, WAIT! Go back and check that there are seats for you to upgrade into using the method I describe earlier in the article. If there are seats available then get on the phone to Virgin quickly and seal that upgrade!

This is the process I’ve gone through to secure a ton of mileage upgrades. Got questions? Let me know either via twitter (@cubedweller) or in the comments below.

How I booked a £3000+ flight for £1427

by Alex on April 7, 2014

Last week I started planning our annual summer pilgrimage to California. This year we have to factor in school holidays for the first time as my eldest son is now in nursery school. So I started to have a play around with some dates on Virgin Atlantic’s website…and quickly realised, this wasn’t going to be cheap.

We’re a family of four now and because Luke is 3 he has to have his own seat, and while he doesn’t pay the full adult fare, it’s pretty close (about 75% of an adult fare). Playing around with the dates, the cheapest I could find for anywhere in the July/August timeframe was £3024.10

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Ouch. I don’t care who you are, that’s a lot of money. And that was with us going for over a month, on the cheapest possible dates, which meant pulling Luke out of school early. If we’d left a day earlier it would have been nearly £3700, that’s how tight everything was looking.

So I activated “travel nerd mode” and started to poke around. Was LAX cheaper? Nope almost exactly the same, even with 2 flights a day. Even if Deanne and Jack went early and Luke and I came when he finished school, we were still only saving about £100. After a few hours of checking alternate cities, alternate dates, and other city combinations, I was beginning to think we might have to postpone our trip.

But not one to admit defeat, I started to explore alternatives.

Now I’ve never been a big believer in using miles for flights - they’re usually much more effective for upgrades. But I figured this might be the rare case where I can use them to pay for a flight. After a few minutes, that idea was torpedoed too. There wasn’t a mileage seat to San Francisco until October! LA was no better. Dammit.

The remaining ace I had up my sleeve was my companion ticket. For re-qualifying at Virgin Atlantic’s Gold level status, you get a free companion ticket. It ain’t as grand as it sounds, the restrictions on fare class and availability make it pretty hard to use. I figured at this point I should give the (usually excellent) Virgin Atlantic customer service card a call. I explained my predicament and I could immediately tell the lady on the other end was up for a challenge – we dove straight in…

As I thought, there was no availability for companion seats to SFO or LAX so that was a bust. But, she said, what about Las Vegas? The Bay Area is a piece of cake to get to from Vegas and it would be a fun place to decompress and get over jetlag for a few days. A quick look at the cash fare revealed the same depressing fare though, around three grand for the four of us.

But then we started look at companion tickets. Ah ha! Availability! I’d need to buy a slightly more expensive ticket (an M class ticket for those keeping score) but  that might  be ok if the taxes and fees on the companion ticket weren’t too awful. Here’s how it was shaping up:

- £1162 for my M Class fare
- £213 in taxes and fees for the companion ticket (Deanne)
- £150 for Jack’s infant ticket
- £863 for Luke’s child ticket
= £2388

Ok, progress! Over £600 off the total airfare cost. But, as my learned friend on the other end of the phone pointed out, I had a stash of miles in my account. Should she run the numbers on a miles seat for Luke instead of cash? Sure, why not! So now we get to:

- £1162 for my M Class fare
- £213 in taxes and fees for the companion ticket (Deanne)
- £213 in taxes and fees for Luke’s miles seat
- £150 for Jack’s infant seat
= £1738

Boom. Now we’re down over £1300 off the cash price. Just as I was about to hand over my credit card details, the voice on the end of the phone (after we’d been talking for over an hour) said “Hmmm…hold on….let me try something….what if the two adults are on mileage seats? You have enough miles if you transfer them over from your wife’s account.” By God, she’d done it:

- £213 in taxes and fees for my mileage seat
- £213 in taxes and fees for Deanne’s mileage seat
- £863 for Luke’s child ticket
- £138 for Jack’s infant seat
= £1427

£1427. Down from a cash price of £3024. A saving of £1597. Same flight, same airplane, same service. And the best part is I still have a companion ticket left to use later in the year. Now because I used miles, I won’t earn miles for this flight, or tier points towards re-upping my Gold card. But given the savings and the circumstances, I think it was well worth it.

The lady at Virgin had to jump through all kinds of technical hoops to get the reservation system to allow this ticket to be issued because of the child/infant dependencies, the miles coming from multiple accounts, etc. It was quite an extraordinary display of dedication and exemplified why I continue to fly Virgin Atlantic.

A few things are worth pointing out:

- redeeming miles on popular routes during quiet times is hard enough, and during peak season it’s nearly impossible. So…
- look around for alternate cities, alternate routes (into your intended destination, out of an alternate city or vice versa), alternate dates.
- redeeming miles when the fare is already pretty reasonable is stupid. Pay the cash, earn the miles and tier points. Don’t piss your miles away unless there are substantial cash savings.
- further to that, in many cases it’s worth paying a little MORE for your economy ticket so you’re in an upgradeable fare class (that ultra-cheap fare you found won’t be upgradeable.) I’ll write a post about how to do that soon.
- it pays to call the reservation line sometimes as they can see mileage and companion/reward seat availability better than you can.

How I fell in love with Pact Coffee’s Service (and got a new case study in customer loyalty)

by Alex on December 18, 2013

I do a lot of public speaking and a topic I frequently speak about is loyalty. One of the most effective ways to create enduring loyalty is bridge the gap between online and offline. I want to share with you the best example of this principle that I’ve ever experienced.

Last weekend I was flicking through Twitter and I came across this sponsored tweet in my feed.

Now we use Pact at Rushmore and their service and their coffee are both very good. Subscription coffee delivered to your door. But I bristle at that word “proper”. It’s an awful word. A lazy word. An elitist word that implies you’re better than everyone. I immediately fired off a reply:

At the very least, my own “get off my lawn” itch was scratched and I put my phone away. But moments later, it dinged and there was a reply. From a company. On a Saturday. Within minutes of the initial contact.

I get what they mean about trying to find the right word but I think companies have every right to be confident and assertive in their product descriptions IF they genuinely feel their products live up to the labels. Confidence in a brand, just like confidence in a person, is attractive.

They graciously and promptly replied almost immediately.

I could end this story here and it would be a great example of a online customer service. But what happened next took it to a whole new level.

Today, as we were all sitting in the office, a delivery arrived. I opened up the recycled Amazon box and found 3 big bags of Pact’s fantastic coffee. No way. No freakin’ way. Did they…they couldn’t have…could they?

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Underneath the bags of coffee was a card…
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*slow clap* They did. They took the time to figure out who I was, where I worked, what our address was, package up the coffee and write out a note. Not only that, the message in the card was so perfect in its tone and context that I immediately got in touch with the company to express my appreciation and admiration.

Learn from Pact. It doesn’t get much better than this.

My year in cities 2013

by Alex on December 17, 2013

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I’ve reached the end of my (air) travels this year and I’m quietly breathing a sigh of relief. It’s been another busy year. A personal record-breaking year, in fact. 45 flights, the most I’ve ever done in a calendar year.

As I stepped off my final flight of the year, I have no problem admitting I was a little emotional. Not because the year’s travel was coming to an end but because I was reminded that just a few years ago I was so scared of flying that the very idea of getting on a plane was enough to make me feel nauseous. Overcoming my fear of flying remains one of my biggest personal achievements. I’m proud of myself, quite frankly. And while it was a gradual process, initially helped with medication, in the last  3 years I’ve flown 115 times. And more importantly, I’ve rediscovered the joy of flying I had as a child and teenager. That’s what I missed the most.

Anyway back to 2013. I’ve been fortunate to visit several new cities this year; Madrid (many, many times), Kiev, Rijeka, Stuttgart, Toronto, Krakow, and Bucharest. I also became intimately familiar with Munich and Frankfurt airports. No trips to Asia this year, the first time that’s happened in 4 years. In fact the furthest east I went was Kiev. No new planes this year either but I got to fly into some neat airports, in particular Rijeka’s cliff-top airport, and London City’s amazing approach. New airlines this year included Swiss International, Germanwings, and Porter, all of whom were ace. I also flew a clapped out LOT 737 which was kinda fun. And I took my first flight on United Airlines since 1997.

But I’m glad the year is drawing to a close. It’s been a long, exhausting year on almost all fronts, and most of my travel has been short, multi-segment trips that are really draining. I love travel, it’s part of who I am, but all the time I’m up in the air is time I’m not with my family. Let’s see what 2014 brings.

- Madrid x 6
- San Francisco x 4
- New York x 4
- Boston
- Kiev
- Krakow
- Poznan
- Rijeka
- Stuttgart
- Dublin
- Toronto
- Geneva
- Bucharest
- Munich
- Frankfurt
- Paris

Average Distance: 1733mi
Average Time: 4h02m
Longest: LHR<->SFO, 5350mi, 11h15m
Shortest: POZ<->WAW, 175mi, 00h51m

Airlines:
Virgin Atlantic – 14 flights
Lufthansa – 9 flights
easyJet – 8 flights
British Airways – 4 flights
Porter Airlines – 2 flights
Germanwings – 2 flights
Aer Lingus – 2 flights
Swiss International Airlines – 1 flight
United Airlines – 1 flight
LOT – 1 flight

Revolution in Kiev

by Alex on December 8, 2013

A few days ago I had the opportunity to witness a revolution. Despite assuring my wife that I wouldn’t be anywhere near the protests in Kiev, on Wednesday night I found myself in the heart of Independence square, the epicentre of the Ukraine’s latest political struggle.

I was in the city to speak at an excellent conference and admittedly a little apprehensive about my first visit to a country gripped by political unrest. The latest news reports spoke of hundreds of thousands gathered in the square, police brutality against protesters and reporters, and the real possibility of national strikes. But we were assured by the organisers that the city was perfectly safe and the conference would carry on as planned. So I jumped on my flight early on Wednesday morning.

I was picked up at the airport by a member  of the team that was putting on the event. During our drive to the hotel and then on to the conference venue, he gave us a thorough and fascinating recap of the events to date and his own personal take on what he thought the future held for the Ukraine. While western media was reporting around a hundred thousand people gathered in the square, local media was reporting closer to a million, and our companion, comparing his experiences from the Orange Revolution, was confident it was near a million.

As we drove through the city, life was going on as normal. Traffic was heavy, people were going to work and school, and commerce was happening freely. If you hadn’t picked up a newspaper recently, you wouldn’t have a sense that anything was out of the ordinary.

Later that night, during a private event at a lavish cocktail lounge overlooking Kiev, I heard rumblings of a possible trip to Independence Square. A few furtive glances between co-conspirators and we were out the door into the very cold Ukrainian night. With us was one of the conference organisers, who gave us a quick briefing to make sure we stayed out of harm’s way.

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At first glance nothing seemed out of the ordinary. Christmas lights were up, people were crowding the bars and restaurants, and the transportation system was humming. But as we got closer to Independence Square, we could hear the dull, unsettling roar of a very large crowd.

We continued towards Independence Square only to discover the entire thing blocked off by a huge barricade made of every household item you could imagine. Doors, tables, lamp posts, shipping pallets, crowd control fences, artificial Christmas, trees, and stepladders were just a few of the construction items of choice.

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Peering through the gaps in the barricade, we caught our first glimpse of the protests.

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We decided that we’d come this far, we might as well carry on, so we rounded the barricade and walked towards the heart of the crowd.

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People were hunkering down for a long, cold night and were building campsites and fires near the barricade.

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The protestors had erected a huge stage with a jumbotron behind it. There were rousing speeches, patriotic music, and news updates from protest organisers.

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I couldn’t tell you exactly how many people there were gathered in the square but it was easily in the tens of thousands. The atmosphere was not threatening or violent or unruly. It’s been suggested that the three main opposition parties are coordinating the protests and in fact the whole thing felt very well organised with toilet facilities and plenty of food and drink on offer. We never felt in danger or unwelcome during our hour or so trip.

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I feel quite privileged to have witnessed this monumental event in person. Sure it was a risk and just about every guide book and travel survival book urges you to stay well away from large crowds or political rallies but we witnessed history in the making. The Ukraine is a country in flux and I hope the Ukrainian people get the change they’re fighting for.

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An ode to London City Airport

by Alex on December 2, 2013

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I travel a lot these days and as exhausting as it can be, my inner plane nerd still revels in the opportunity to experience new planes, new airports, and new new flying experiences. Recently I got a chance to do something I’ve wanted to do for a long time – land at London City Airport.

Now hold on you non-plane nerds, hear me me out before you close that browser tab. This is pretty neat.

So London City Airport is relatively new  (first flight in 1987) and it’s located in the Docklands area of London ostensibly to serve London’s financial district. It’s a small, functional airport with a single runway built on a causeway just next to the Thames.

Now here’s the challenge; the airport has a short 4900ft runway (that’s shorter than Livermore’s runway, for my local peeps) and is surrounded by buildings. And due to the proximity to Central London, there are super strict noise abatement regulations. On the fact of it, it sounds totally impractical but the engineers came up with a solution; make the landing approach steep as hell to minimise noise.

The average approach angle (or glideslope) to a normal airport is around 2-3 degrees. London City, when it first opened, was a stomach dropping 7.5 degrees, an unheard of angle for a European airport.  Couple that steep approach with the short runway and you are in for quite a ride. In fact only certain types of airplanes can operate at LCY and pilots have to be specially trained to shoot the approach.

Anyway, enough back story, let me share my experience with you:

I was flying in from Frankfurt on a Lufthansa E-190, the perfect plane for LCY. To make things even more interesting, we were arriving at night. Our approach took us down the Thames Estuary right over Central London at a very low altitude giving us the most spectacular view of the capital. We banked hard into a 180 degree turn right over the London Eye and then back down the Thames. At this point, the pilot gets the plane in the “dirtiest” configuration possible, i.e. the airplane is fully configured for landing at the slowest possible speed; flaps fully extended, speed brakes deployed, gear down. By now, the plane is on dat glideslope and dropping agressively. The speed brakes disrupt the lift over the wing creating turbulent air and the aircraft begins to shake, as though it’s really struggling to stay in the air.* Airspeed and altitude continue to bleed away quickly as you approach the runway. The plane hits the runway hard as the last remaining lift being generated by the wings ebbs away. The (auto) pilot engages the thrust reverses and hits the brakes hard; remember you’re on a short runway with a whole lot of water at the end of it, and the planes shudders to a halt.

Now that, THAT, is real flying. I was grinning like a moron for the entire landing while my fellow passengers never lifted their noses from their worn copies of the FT. They have no idea what they were missing.

* Let’s be clear, the plane IS shaking but it’s not struggling to stay in the air. The e-190 revels in this type of approach and while it’s not exactly “normal” it’s entirely safe. 

11 things I learned in New England

by Alex on September 26, 2013

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  1. There are not enough Dunkin’ Donuts in New England. Wait, I mistyped that. There are more Dunkin’ Donuts than people in New England.
  2. Almost every single New Englander I met was outgoing, friendly, confident, and chatty. Even the surly ones were hugely entertaining. e.g. When I enquired as to how a supermarket worker’s day was going, she replied “It’s Saturday, I’m stuck inside, it’s busy as hell…so pretty lousy. But the Sox clinched last night so I can’t complain. That’ll be 23 bucks, hun.”
  3. A lot of people still smoke there. California and London have skewed my sense of “normal” on this one.
  4. It’s one of the most beautiful parts of America I’ve ever seen. Water everywhere, tree-lined boulevards, quaint towns, pristine beaches.
  5. Hot sauce is quite hard to come by. My brother’s explanation is that while west coast food has heavy latin american influence, east coast food is mainly influenced by European cuisine and therefore not as hot-sauceable. (It is so a word, shut up.)
  6. You haven’t had clam chowder until you’ve had it in New England.
  7. Boston Logan International takes the crown for the worst airport in the developed world. Try parking there, I dare you.
  8. Tom Brady is 16ft tall and once threw over 400 touchdown passes in a single season.
  9. Clam bakes are delicious, entertaining, and scaleable. Everything good food should be.
  10. I could listen to a Boston accent forever.
  11. “Wicked pisser” means really great. And a “shit buddy” is a great friend. Not a shit friend. Counter-intuitive, I know.

The shittiness of the Saturday-night stay rule

by Alex on September 26, 2013

A few weeks ago I posted on Twitter about the shittiness of the Saturday-night stay rule that airlines use to fleece business travellers. If you’re not familiar with the rule, many airlines require passengers to spend a Saturday night in their destination city to get a half-decent fare. Wikipedia explains it further:

The rule is based on the airlines’ assumption that business travellers are more likely than leisure travellers to spend Saturday night at home. For example, a business traveler may depart on a Sunday or Monday and then return home that Friday or Saturday.

Business travellers’ demand for travel is less elastic and airlines attempt to increase their profits by price discriminating business travellers and leisure travellers. Business travels are also more loyal to a particular airline, and therefore are more likely to accept higher price.

Today, I came across a perfect example:

London to New York, roundtrip.

Leave on Wednesday, fly back at 10:25pm on Saturday night = £1521.45

Leave on Wednesday, fly back at 7:20am on Sunday morning = £480.45

Less than 9 hours difference in departure time but a cost increase of over £1000.

Dick move, right? The rule assumes that all businesses are big businesses and have huge travel budgets. What about the hundreds of thousands of small businesses that DON’T have big travel budgets. Or the leisure traveler who gets caught up in a rule that is purposely designed to screw the consumer?

Oh and here’s the hilarious “WTF?” cherry on this horse poo cake. The base fare on the Sunday flight is only £124. The rest is taxes and fees. And yes, the taxes and fees are exactly the same on the Saturday flight. So the airline jacked up the base fare by 850%. So there you have it, a £1000 “convenience” fee for business travellers to make it home in time to spend the weekend with their families.

Saturday-night Stay Rule

Wooden mockup of a single deck 747

by Alex on August 17, 2013

This mockup was made to show the difference between a single-deck and double-deck version of the new Boeing plane that eventually became the 747. It’s purpose was to convince former PanAm chairman Juan Trippe that he didn’t need a double-deck airplane and that a new category of single-deck plane, which came to be known as the “jumbo jet”, would scratch his “ocean liner style” itch.

To give an idea of what the single deck cabin and the double deck cabin would look like, two lumber and plywood mock-ups were built (see picture above for the single deck mock-up). PanAm chairman & his team flew down west to evaluate the options. “Would PanAm agree for the single deck?” It was a tense moment for Joe. After reviewing the mock-ups Trippe told Joe, “You made the right decision”.

How I lost 12lbs in 30 days (and that’s not the best part)

by Alex on July 13, 2013

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Recently I finished an interesting experiment. And as a result I’m 12 lbs lighter. But that’s not the headline outcome, not by a long shot.

About a year ago I started my weight loss journey and I’m delighted to say I’ve managed to keep 50lbs off ever since. However in the last few months my diet lapsed a bit, I was traveling a lot, and embarked on a new career chapter – none of which are conducive to a healthy lifestyle. As a result, I gave back a few of the pounds I lost. Maybe 5 or 6, tops. But it was enough for me to reconsider my approach to food, drink, and exercise.

But instead of going back to the regimen that was so successful for me in the first place, I thought I’d try a body hacking experiment. What would happen if I adopted an ultra-strict regimen with no cheat days? What would the effect be on my physique, my mood, my sleep, my concentration? The results were fascinating.

I decided for 30 days I would have:

- NO white or refined carbohydrates (e.g. sugar, pasta, bread, potatoes, flour, etc)

- NO dairy

- NO alcohol

- NO red meat

- NO soda

- NO coffee

(For context, I drank 3-4 cups of coffee per day, at least one diet coke, and a glass of wine in the evening.)

The elimination of soda and coffee was to see the effect on my teeth and on my sleep and concentration.

Removing white/refined carbs, alcohol, red meat, and dairy was to see the effect on body composition and weight loss.

I wanted to see a) if I could even do this for 30 days and b) what the overall effect on my body would be.

I began the experiment on a Monday.

As I wandered bleary-eyed into the office on the first day, I instinctively lunged towards to the coffee machine but managed to catch myself before deploying the mediocre “americano” into my chipped and overused mug. I opted for green tea instead, a habit I maintained for the entire 30 days.

The rest of the day looked like this:

Breakfast: Protein shake first thing in the morning followed by fruit when I got to the office.

Lunch: The office salad bar (leaves, vegetables, hard boiled eggs, smoked salmon, tuna, etc) or cold grilled chicken and vegetables.

Dinner: All manner of chicken, fish, turkey, pork, eggs with every vegetable I could think of. Dinner was easy and satisfying every single time.

Snacks: Almonds, fruit, carrot sticks, etc.

Exercise: Nothing beyond my 4-mile roundtrip walk to/from work.

The first week was the toughest but not what I predicted. Giving up carbs, red meat and dairy was easy. It was the coffee and alcohol that proved very difficult. Coffee was such a habit that its absence in my daily routine was immediately noticeable. And I enjoyed a glass of red wine when I got home in the evening, especially after a hard day. But after the first week, the changes started to happen.

Immediately the weight started to come off. But I also had better concentration, more energy, no afternoon slumps, and the quality of my sleep had noticeably improved. The cravings also disappeared after the first two weeks as well.

I kept the routine up for a full 30 days, no cheat days, no cheat meals. And I dropped 12lbs and inches off my waist. I now wear a small size t-shirt and need a new belt.

But on the 31st day, something weird happened. I was finally free to eat whatever I wanted, drink a load of coffee, have a hunk of cake and wash it down with some wine. But I didn’t want to do any of that. Instead, I had my protein shake, my green tea, a salad for lunch, and a protein heavy dinner. It was the weirdest goddamn thing.

I kept thinking, if I’m going to have a cup of coffee then I want the best damn cup I can find. So I waited until I had access to one, and it was totally worth the wait. Made it all worthwhile. Same with wine, red meat, and soda. I actually paid £3 for a can of Diet Dr Pepper imported from the US so the reward would be so much sweeter.

So ultimately here’s what I found:

- for me 30 days seems to be what it takes to turn exception into rule, hardship into habit.

- it’s easy to lose weight even with kids and an office job as long as you have a shred of discipline.

- carbohydrates are a dangerous addiction with almost no value.

- good food is worth waiting for. If I want something that’s not so healthy, I’m going to find the most delicious, well made example I can.

I’m interested to see if I can apply this 30-day mentality to other challenges. Exercise, finance, learning, etc.